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Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Remembering Sandy Hook Elementary

I am writing this post more for myself than anyone else. I know that everyone has seen these stories & poems. I wanted a special place to have them all together for future remembrance.

December 14, 2012 is yet another day that will go down in American infamy. Too many tragic events mar the timeline in American history. Its a shame that evil is so prevalent in our society today.

Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Ct will now forever be remembered as the place where 20 kindergarten children & 6 teachers were mercilessly gunned down. The media is relentless in their airing of this senseless act of violence. Everything from encouraging words, to those precious angels' faces, to conspiracy theories, to gun control are all anyone can discuss right now.

I don't mind the news coverage. In fact I find it hard to turn away when its on TV. But I can't help but wonder if this somehow desensitizes America to violence.

We must never get to the point where murder, evil, & violence become second nature to us!

This poem by Cameo Smith brought tears to my eyes.
"Twas' 11 days before Christmas, around 9:38
when 20 beautiful children stormed through heaven's gate.
Their smiles were contagious, their laughter filled the air.
They could hardly believe all the beauty they saw there.
They were filled with such joy; they didn't know what to say.
They remembered nothing of what had happened earlier that day.
“Where are we?" asked a little girl, as quiet as ...a mouse.
“This is heaven" declared a small boy. "We’re spending Christmas at God's house”.
When what to their wondering eyes did appear,
but Jesus, their savior, the children gathered near.
He looked at them and smiled, and they smiled just the same.
Then He opened His arms and He called them by name.
And in that moment was joy, that only heaven can bring
those children all flew into the arms of their King
and as they lingered in the warmth of His embrace,
one small girl turned and looked at Jesus' face.
And as if He could read all the questions she had
He gently whispered to her, "I'll take care of mom and dad.
“Then He looked down on earth, the world far below
He saw all of the hurt, the sorrow, and woe,
then He closed His eyes and He outstretched His hand,
“Let My power and presence re-enter this land!
“May this country be delivered from the hands of fools”
“I’m taking back my nation. I'm taking back my schools!
“Then He and the children stood up without a sound.
“Come now my children let me show you around.
“Excitement filled the space, some skipped and some ran.
All displaying enthusiasm that only a small child can.
And I heard Him proclaim as He walked out of sight,
“in the midst of this darkness,” I AM STILL THE LIGHT."

Max Lucado's "A Christmas Prayer" reminds us that darkness is not a new thing.
"Dear Jesus,
It's a good thing you were born at night. This world sure seems dark. I have a good eye for silver linings. But they seem dimmer lately.
These killings, Lord. These children, Lord. Innocence violated. Raw evil demonstrated.
The whole world seems on edge. Trigger-happy. Ticked off. We hear threats of chemical weapons and nuclear bombs. Are we one button-push away from annihilation?
Your world seems a bit darker this Christmas. But you were born in the dark, right? You came at night. The shepherds were nightshift workers. The Wise Men followed a star. Your first cries were heard in the shadows. To see your face, Mary and Joseph needed a candle flame. It was dark. Dark with Herod's jealousy. Dark with Roman oppression. Dark with poverty. Dark with violence.
Herod went on a rampage, killing babies. Joseph took you and your mom into Egypt. You were an immigrant before you were a Nazarene.
Oh, Lord Jesus, you entered the dark world of your day. Won't you enter ours? We are weary of bloodshed. We, like the wise men, are looking for a star. We, like the shepherds, are kneeling at a manger.
This Christmas, we ask you, heal us, help us, be born anew in us.

Hopefully,
Your Children"



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